14 Ways to Get on The Canadian Path

Is your Section all set to get on The Canadian Path? Adjusting to the changes to our Scouting program can be intimidating, so we’ve come up with 14 simple ways that you can take your first steps.

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  1. Let the Youth lead. Youth-led is one of the Four Elements of The Canadian Path, so it’s a good place to start. Be open to the Youth’s ideas and feedback, and let the Youth take on age-appropriate responsibilities for planning their adventures.
  2. 14-Ways-to-Get-on-The-Canadian-Path-2_11  Party! With The Canadian Path, Scouts Canada is embarking on a great new adventure. Get your Section excited for the changes to its program with a launch party. You can celebrate by checking out the contents of your Canadian Path Starter Kit!
  3. scouter-tictac_03Hey you! One of the small but difficult changes with The Canadian Path is switching over to the title “Scouter.” The title is important, though, because the Youth are the leaders of the program – not the adults.
  4.  Include the big kids. Introduce parents to The Canadian Path. Invite them to a meeting and give them a chance to get to know what the changes to our program are all about. Youth can tell their parents all about their roles in the Section and let their parents know how they can help them to be successful.
  5. woodbadge_03 Re-cert your skills. Refresh your Scouting know-how. Check out Scouts Canada’s new eLearning modules to get you up to speed on The Canadian Path.
  6. Binge on Scouts Canada’s YouTube channel. Scouts Canada has more than one Canadian Path playlist on its YouTube channel. Check out all of the great new videos and get all the new terms and concepts down pat!
  7. Enjoy that new adventure smell. There’s nothing like a great new adventure. Sticking to the familiar doesn’t always work. Invite new ideas from your Section’s Youth to keep their program fresh and exciting!
  8. program-cycles-badge_03Plan in cycles. Use the Plan-Do-Review cycle to get the most out of your program. Make use of the program cycles (seasons) to keep planning focused and manageable.
  9. Take pride in not being perfect. It’s usually pretty obvious when a Kub Kar’s been made with more than just a helping hand from a parent. When a Cub Scout builds her own Kub Kar, she gets more out of the activity. A Youth-led program will not be perfect, but it belongs to the Youth.
  10. Have questions – not answers. It’s a Scouter’s role to foster common sense. Scouting Youth should learn to be problem solvers. Help Youth to think through challenges. Ask the right questions and let the Youth figure things out.
  11. beaver-trees_03See the trees – not the forest. One of the most important tasks for a Scouter is to support the personal progression of youth in the Section. Remember that personal progression pertains to individual Youth; you can’t always think in collective terms.
  12. Reviewing is fun! Reviewing is generally the most overlooked part of the Plan-Do-Review cycle, but it’s an important step for youth to retain the lessons they’ve learned from their adventures. Remember that reviewing doesn’t mean sitting in a circle and answering the same questions after every adventure. Mix things up. Play games, draw pictures, make videos, perform skits – there are countless ways for youth to review their adventures and appreciate how they’ve grown.
  13. Learn from the youth. One of the obstacles to Youth-led Scouting is the belief held by many Scouters that they always know best. Approach your meetings and outings with an open mind and be prepared to learn from the Youth in your Section. By simply watching the Youth solve their own problems, you’re bound to learn a thing or two yourself.
  14. scout-method-01_03Think small. The Patrol (Team) System is part of the Scout Method. Every Section should make use of teams of six to eight Youth when planning, doing and reviewing adventures. Small groups allow Youth more opportunities to express themselves, and they provide more opportunities for Youth to take on leadership roles.

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